Meet Magination Press Author: Andrew P. Smiler, PhD

smiler headshot 2014-08Andrew P. Smiler, PhD, is a therapist and author residing in Winston-Salem, NC. Andrew holds a PhD in developmental psychology from the University of New Hampshire and a master’s degree in clinical psychology from Towson University. He has authored more than 20 journal articles and book chapters relating to boys, men, sexual development, and identity issues, namely, Challenging Casanova: Beyond the Stereotype of the Promiscuous Young Male (Jossey-Bass/Wiley) and co-author, with Chris Kilmartin, of the best-selling men’s studies textbook The Masculine Self, 5th Edition (Sloan Publishing). He has authored more than 20 journal articles and book chapters relating to boys, men, sexual development, and identity issues.

If you talk to Andrew he will tell you he’s just a regular guy. After all, that’s what guys have been trained to say, right? But in truth, as every guy knows, there really is no such thing as regular. And that’s the subject of Andrew’s latest book with Magination Press, Dating and Sex: A Guide for 21st Century Teen Boys. I recently caught up with Andrew to dig a little more and find out what makes Andrew tick.

With that, I’m happy to introduce to you, Andrew Smiler, PhD.

What books have you written? My newest book is Dating and Sex: A Guide for 21st Century Teen Boys. In some ways, it’s the sequel to Challenging Casanova: Beyond the Stereotype of the Promiscuous Young Male. Casanova was written for adults who are interested in having a better understanding of teen boys’ sexual development. Dating and Sex is written for boys, as the title suggests. I’m also the co-author, with Chris Kilmartin, of a textbook called The Masculine Self used  in college-level Men’s Studies courses.

dating and sex

What’s your normal writing process? How do you decide what topics to write on? Most of my writing is about dismantling stereotypes of boys and men, especially when those stereotypes are based on what a small percentage of guys do instead of being based on the majority.

What is fun or unexpected about the writing process? I never expected to write a book and now I’ve written three with plans for more. That’s entirely unexpected and I still don’t quite believe it.

What do you do when you’re not writing books? When I’m at work and not writing, I’m usually working with a teen boy or young man in therapy. When I’m not working, you might find me hanging out with my family, doing yoga, or spending time with friends.

How does it feel to be a published author? It’s still a little strange. Did I mention being surprised that I’ve written a book, let alone 3 of them?

Do you have any fun facts to share that readers might not know? Most guys will tell you what “most guys” do. And most guys are wrong about what “most guys” do.

Any advice for new authors? I like to do a “free write,” which I call a “vomit draft.” I’ll just write without worrying about what’s coming out, whether or not it makes sense, or if it’s any good. Then I’ll print it and re-read to find the good stuff. Most of that draft—sometimes as much as 90%—gets deleted, but the process and the remaining 10% help me figure out what I want to say and how I want to say it.

Thanks Andrew! —ke

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